Public Positions

Public Positions | The Restitution of African Art | 25 Feb 2020 | 4pm

WiSER invites you to a lunchtime lecture in our new series PUBLIC POSITIONS, by  Felwine Sarr on THE RESTITUTION OF AFRICAN ART

Public Positions: The Implications of Anglo's Fall

WISER, the Department of Politics and History Workshop invite you to join us for a panel discussion in the series of Public Positions on History and Politics:

A video recording of this event is available below.

Chair:

Intersectional Writing in Times of Protest

WiSER, in collaboration with Media Studies at Wits, warmly invites you to its opening event for 2016:   

Interrogating South African Political Economy : Fine and Rustomjee's Minerals-Energy Complex

As the first of a series on new forms of political economy, WISER invites researchers to a seminar on Ben Fine and Zavareh Rustomjee's The Political Economy of South Africa: From Minerals-Energy Complex to Industrialisation (Westview Press, 1996). 

When:  Thursday 16 July 2015 at 2pm in the WISER Seminar room.

Public positions on History and Politics : Racism, recognition and justice

WISER, the Department of Politics and History Workshop invite you to join us for the eighth panel discussion in the series of Public Positions on History and Politics:

Chair:

The Matric as Metric : Public Positions on Social Justice

Live video streaming of this event is available here.

Public Positions : Police against the People

At 4:30pm on Monday April 14 the second event in the Public Positions series will be hosted at WISER.

Streaming for this event, from 4:45pm, is available at http://streaming.wits.ac.za

Public Positions on History and Politics : The Cost of Justice

The Cost of Justice

Briefing Paper for Public Positions Theme Event, 24 March 2014

WiSER, History Workshop & Wits Political Studies Department

Jonathan Klaaren (jonathan.klaaren@wits.ac.za)

Introduction

Although South Africa’s legal and constitutional regime is one of the best in the world, meaningful access to justice remains largely a function of economic resources. This briefing paper examines the reasons for -- and controversies around -- the costs of legal representation in South Africa as well opening up the concept of access to justice more broadly. Framed within the social justice concerns of the Public Positions series, the paper largely conceives of the legal services sector as a market consisting of the producers of legal services, the consumers of legal services, and the product itself: legal services. The aim here is to ask the social justice question of this ‘market’: over the long term who is meant to bear the costs of justice? The state? Citizens? Corporates? Donors?

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